Dalrymple “Dolly” Briggs (Mountgarret)Age: 56 years18081864

Name
Dalrymple “Dolly” Briggs (Mountgarret)
Given names
Dalrymple
Nickname
Dolly
Surname
Briggs (Mountgarret)
Married name
Dalrymple Johnson
Nickname
Dolly
Birth 1808
MarriageThomas JohnsonView this family
October 29, 1831 (Age 23 years)

Note: Tasmania Marriages 1803-1899
Birth of a daughter
#1
Mary Johnson
May 26, 1843 (Age 35 years)
Note: Tasmania Births 1803-1933
Birth of a daughter
#2
Charlotte Johnson
March 21, 1845 (Age 37 years)
Note: Tasmania Births 1803-1933
Birth of a son
#3
Alfred WIlliam Johnson
August 27, 1847 (Age 39 years)
Note: Tasmania Births 1803-1933
Birth of a son
#4
William Johnson
May 7, 1849 (Age 41 years)
Note: Tasmania Births 1803-1933
Birth of a daughter
#5
Sarah Johnson
January 3, 1852 (Age 44 years)

Note: Tasmania Births 1803-1933
Birth of a son
#6
Walter James Johnson
June 30, 1854 (Age 46 years)
Note: Tasmania Births 1803-1933
Death 1864 (Age 56 years)

Note: Tasmania Deaths 1803-1933
Note: Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) - Thu 22 Dec 1864 - Page 5 - Family Notices
Family with Thomas Johnson - View this family
husband
herself
Marriage: October 29, 1831
12 years
daughter
22 months
daughter
2 years
son
20 months
son
3 years
daughter
3 years
son

Marriage
Tasmania Marriages 1803-1899 First name(s) Thomas Last name Johnson Sex Male Marriage year 1831 Marriage date 29 Oct 1831 Registration year 1831 District Longford State Tasmania Country Australia Spouse's first name(s) Dalrymple Spouse's last name Briggs Spouse's sex Female Registration number 1778
Death
Tasmania Deaths 1803-1933 First name(s) Dalrymple Mt Garrett Last name Johnson Birth year 1810 Death year 1864 State Tasmania Country Australia District Port Sorell Sex Female Age at death 54 Registration year 1864 Spouse's name Thomas Registration number 462
Death
Launceston Examiner (Tas. : 1842 - 1899) - Thu 22 Dec 1864 - Page 5 - Family Notices https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/38657038 JOHNSON—At Sherwood, River Mersey, on 1st December, Dalrymple Mountgarret Johnson, the beloved wife of Mr. Thos. Johnson, of the above place, aged 54.
Note
Advocate (Burnie, Tas. : 1890 - 1954) - Thu 17 Sep 1953 - Page 4 - PUBLIC OPINION https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/69489935 Frogmore first settled, 1836; ''Devon Herald," first news paper, founded 1877; Mrs. Thomas Johnson (nee the fa mous Dolly Dalrymple) fought the blacks off with a shotgun from her residence at Dalry Plains (Chudleigh), 1831, prior to settling at Sherwood, La trobe, with her husband, who purchased nearly all Sherwood and Tarleton.
Note
Advocate (Burnie, Tas. : 1890 - 1954) - Thu 5 Jan 1933 - Page 3 - LATROBE'S FIRST SETTLER A WOMAN. https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/67992761 Dolly Dalrymple. No mention is made of Mr. Johnson's wife; yet the story of her life is more interesting than many others. She was as remarkable as the first Iady who owned the demesne of Frogmore. Her mother was a native Tasmanian of the Port Dalrymple tribe, and before her marriage she was known as Dolly Dalrymple. Her father was a white man living at the Georgetown settlement, and when Dolly was a piccaninny about six or eight months old, her mother bethought her to swim across to Kelso and pay a visit to her tribe. The baby was fastened to her back in the native fashion. Perhaps she hoped they would admire the pretty light brown baby, with big blue eyes and curly brown hair (not frizzy), but the reverse happened, they evidently thought the baby did not favor the Dalrymple side of the house or maybe considered the mother had made a misalliance, so without giving her afternoon tea, or its equivalent, mussels and cockles, they chased her to the beach and threatened her with spears. The brave mother plunged into the Tamar, and swam swiftly towards Georgetown. Her tribesmen could have quickly overtaken her, being equally export swimmers, but did not attempt to do so. They threw a few spears after to "speed the parting guest," and one struck the poor baby on the hip. I always wished to know if that cruel spear remained in the poor wee one's hip all the long swim from Kelso to Georgetown. Whether the mother pulled it out, or whether the wavelets washed it away is unknown, but it is certain that gallant little curly head was hold erect above the sea water, and the brown baby lingers clutched firmly in her mother's hair, and Dolly held on tight, spear or not. The commanding officer and his wife did all, they could for the baby, but she always limped, and mother and child remained under their protection. Aboriginal Romance. The child was intelligent, and learnt to read, write, speak plain English, to sew and do domestic work. She was fond of reading. In her teens she married, and came to live at Sherwood. Here she and her husband lived out their lives. They must have seen many floods, but Dolly was early introduced to more water than ever flowed over Frogmore flats. She swam and dived in the Mersey and fished on its banks until every turn and twist, hole wind and shallow must have become familiar. She found time to read look after domestic duties, and in due time six or seven children also. The old mother who sat in the chimney corner helped with the children, and from her, the eldest boy (who seems to have inherited his mother's taste for literature) learnt aboriginal folk lore which he wrote down, and he also composed poetry. I wonder who taught him to read and write? Perhaps his mother. About the middle of the fifties our heroine found that four miles away there lived a young Englishwoman who owned books and was willing to lend, and ready to talk over the contents of the volumes. Dolly liked history, travels, and biography, and also poetry. Such were the books she borrowed, and they were always returned. Then, with a fresh book carefully wrapped, she would wend her way home along the narrow bush track that ran along the ridge and skirted the marshes. About 1866 an observer described her as inclined to be rather tall, with an erect carriage of head and shoulders, but in her gait a slight limp. Light brown skin and dark brown hair, rather curly, and sunburnt in tint where the sun caught it, features not pronouncedly aboriginal, more inclined to European, but most arresting of all were her large dark blue, deep-set eyes, with their far-seeing look, and she had a thoughtful expression of face.